Singapore takes the lead as a global wellness destination

Singapore Tourism Board joins Global Wellness Institute as first country partner in its new Geography of Wellness microsite.

Singapore joins as first country partner in Global Wellness Institute's Geography of Wellness microsite.
Singapore joins as first country partner in Global Wellness Institute's Geography of Wellness microsite.

The non-profit Global Wellness Institute (GWI), the leading research and educational resource for the $4.4 trillion global wellness industry, today launched “Geography of Wellness” with the help of its first country partner, Singapore.

The new GWI microsite takes a deep-dive into a country’s wellness economy, painting a clear picture of where it is positioned in the booming wellness market and giving countries a platform to showcase their wellness assets.

GWI’s 2021 research report, “The Global Wellness Economy: Looking Beyond Covid,” forecasts that the wellness economy is on track to expand to $7 trillion by 2025.

Susie Ellis, GWI chair and CEO shares: “Wellness is on a huge upwards trajectory and GWI’s rich country and regional data is a key tool for helping investors, business leaders and government agencies crystalise the significant wellness market opportunities ahead,” continues Ellis.

According to GWI’s research, Singapore’s wellness economy is ranked #14 among Asia Pacific’s 45 countries, a region that was also one of the fastest-growing wellness markets (+8.1%) between the 2017 to 2019 pre-pandemic years and shrank the least during 2020 (-6.4%).

Beth McGroarty, GWI’s VP of research shares that Singapore provides an "an ideal conference location for wellness-minded meetings planners".
Beth McGroarty, GWI’s VP of research shares that Singapore provides an "an ideal conference location for wellness-minded meetings planners". Photo Credit: Global Wellness Institute

“As more conference organisers strive to integrate both passive wellness (clean air, nutritious food, access to nature, etc.) and active wellness (exercise, exploration, culture, etc.) into their programmes, GWI’s Geography of Wellness microsite provides meeting organisers with an easy tool to quickly understand and analyse the unique wellness assets that destinations around the globe can offer,” says Beth McGroarty, GWI’s VP of research.

Adds McGroarty: “The holistic wellness that Singapore offers – a city in nature where rest and rejuvenation are readily available – is an ideal conference location for wellness-minded meetings planners thanks to its world-class parks and gardens, numerous 4- and 5-star wellness hotels and resorts, nature-based attractions and rich landscape of traditional and innovative wellness activities, while being in the heart of a city offering every modern convenience and luxury.

GWI’s Geography of Wellness also highlights Singapore’s standings in the eleven wellness sectors that GWI tracks within the wellness economy. In 2020, Singapore ranked among the top 30 countries in several categories, including #19 for Wellness Real Estate, #29 for Public Health, Prevention & Personalised Medicine, and #30 for Traditional & Complementary, among the 218 countries worldwide where GWI collects data.

“The wellness economy data that GWI provides is important as it will help us identify opportunities to grow Singapore’s appeal in the wellness tourism space,” says Ong Ling Lee, Executive Director, Sports & Wellness, Singapore Tourism Board.

In addition to featuring country-specific wellness economic data in the Geography of Wellness section of the GWI website, which is considered the leading online resource for unbiased global wellness research, the partnership also includes a dedicated Singapore Wellness Economy Report. This report is free to download and it takes a detailed dive into Singapore’s position in all 11 wellness sectors. 



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